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FLOOR COVERING IDEAS - FLOOR COVERING


Floor Covering Ideas - Floorplan 3d Design Suite 10.0 - Stainless Steel Floor Waste



Floor Covering Ideas





floor covering ideas







    ideas
  • A thought or suggestion as to a possible course of action

  • A concept or mental impression

  • (idea) the content of cognition; the main thing you are thinking about; "it was not a good idea"; "the thought never entered my mind"

  • (idea) a personal view; "he has an idea that we don't like him"

  • An opinion or belief

  • (idea) mind: your intention; what you intend to do; "he had in mind to see his old teacher"; "the idea of the game is to capture all the pieces"











floor covering ideas - Rubber-Cal Puzzle-Lock




Rubber-Cal Puzzle-Lock Interlocking Garage Flooring - 3/8x20x20inch, 20 Pack, 55 Sqr/Ft- Black Mats


Rubber-Cal Puzzle-Lock Interlocking Garage Flooring - 3/8x20x20inch, 20 Pack, 55 Sqr/Ft- Black Mats



Puzzle-Lock 20 packs will cover 55 square feet and can turn your garage into a gym, game room, office, workshop, play-room, or a pet-room in a cost conscious way. Expect this interlocking rubber tile to possibly outlast your idea for the space. This rubber floor tile is durable and is not affected by weather, moisture, or common household cleansers. It is easily cleaned with a mop. Since it is a modular tile, you can easily remove it when you move. This tile will move with you. This gives the Puzzle-Lock rubber tiles longer life when compared to conventional flooring like carpet or wood. We expect years of service from its solid recycled rubber content which is why we offer a 3 year manufacturerOs warranty on the tiles.










85% (18)





Mop cover 2009 (floor side)




Mop cover 2009 (floor side)





Not the most exciting project in the world, not my original pattern, nor my original idea, BUT I have a variety of leftover 100 pecent cotton yarn from various baby projects and found this is a great way to use it up!

I gave up the disposable sheets the company recommends as being too wasteful years ago - I had been using up a rag on the bottom, of the mop but this is much more fun!











Gladiator Idea Gallery: Imagine Your Workspace Scenario




Gladiator Idea Gallery: Imagine Your Workspace Scenario





Visit the Gladiator Transformed My Garage Group to see how other fans suggest using Gladiator in your garage.









floor covering ideas








floor covering ideas




Rubber-Cal Super-Grip Scraper, A Non-Slip Traction Mat - 5mm Thick x 4ft x 4ft Rubber Mats






Rubber-Cal's Super-Grip Scraper is a 5mm thick virgin and recycled rolled rubber mat that provides the best traction due to the hard pyramid style protrusions. The surface pattern is designed to maintain traction regardless of debris and liquids present keeping foot traffic safe while maximizing the ease of cleaning and comfort. Super-Grip Scraper is designed for heavy foot traffic where traction and increased safety is needed and performs especially well in applications containing snow, ice, sleet, wet or damp areas (e.g. ramps, inclines, temporary walkways, etc...). The fabric base-finish adds subsurface traction, keeping the runners bottom surface secure to the floor. Since this product is made from virgin SBR and it creates a completely watertight surface, offers moderate chemical resistance, and can be cleaned with most common household cleaners. Strong, highly caustic cleaning solutions (e.g. bleach) is not recommended. A simple and easy installation with Orcon's DS-PS double-sided tape makes for an easy DIY project that will result in a safer or comfortable entranceway for everyone.










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24
2011
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FREE FLOOR PLAN PROGRAM. FREE FLOOR


Free floor plan program. Floors for basement.



Free Floor Plan Program





free floor plan program






    floor plan
  • scale drawing of a horizontal section through a building at a given level; contrasts with elevation

  • (Floor planning) Floorplanning is the act of designing of a floorplan, which is a kind of bird's-eye view of a structure.

  • In architecture and building engineering, a floor plan, or floorplan, is a diagram, usually to scale, showing the relationships between rooms, spaces and other physical features at one level of a structure.

  • A scale diagram of the arrangement of rooms in one story of a building





    program
  • Provide (a computer or other machine) with coded instructions for the automatic performance of a particular task


  • Cause (a person or animal) to behave in a predetermined way

  • Input (instructions for the automatic performance of a task) into a computer or other machine

  • arrange a program of or for; "program the 80th birthday party"

  • plan: a series of steps to be carried out or goals to be accomplished; "they drew up a six-step plan"; "they discussed plans for a new bond issue"





    free
  • able to act at will; not hampered; not under compulsion or restraint; "free enterprise"; "a free port"; "a free country"; "I have an hour free"; "free will"; "free of racism"; "feel free to stay as long as you wish"; "a free choice"

  • Without cost or payment

  • grant freedom to; free from confinement

  • loose: without restraint; "cows in India are running loose"

  • With the sheets eased











New York Free Circulating Library, Bloomingdale Branch




New York Free Circulating Library, Bloomingdale Branch





Morningside, Manhattan, New York City, New York, United States

The New York Free Circulating Library, Bloomingdale Branch, was the only building commissioned and built by the New York Free Circulating Library and as such is an expression of the library's commitment to the branch circulating library system during the period of peak expansion prior to consolidation with the New York Public Library. A distinguished eighteenth-century French Classic style design inspired by Italian Renaissance and other related sources, it is one of four pre-Camegie era library buildings in New York City and serves as a reminder of the legacy of private philanthropic support of the city's libraries during the nineteenth century. The design of the building, constructed in 1898, by James Brown Lord, architect of the New York Appellate Division Courthouse, appears to have been an influential prototype in the development of the urban branch library, as demonstrated by the design program for the Carnegie gift branch buildings constructed in the early years of the twentieth century.

The building, which remains virtually unchanged from the original design, served as the Bloomingdale Branch of the New York Public Library until 1960 and continues in use as a library and research facility for the Ukrainian Academy of Arts and Sciences.

The Bloomingdale Branch building, three stories over a basement, is of steel-frame fireproof construction with brick upper walls. The library was planned with the circulating library located on the main floor; bookshelves lined the walls and served as a room divider, separating the adult and children's areas. A reading room and reference library with a capacity of thirty-six seats occupied the second floor, and the third floor was devoted to janitor's quarters and a storage room. The lighting of the facility was carefully planned and incorporated large windows in the front and smaller windows above the wall shelves at the rear, a large, inclined skylight with Luxfor prismatic glass, and fixtures fitted for both gas and electricity.

The Bloomingdale Branch was erected at a time when there was great interest among both librarians and architects in the design of modem libraries. The well-publicized competition for the main building of the New York Public Library in 1897, the recent construction of the Library of Congress and the Boston Public Library, and the planning of public libraries in many cities, as well as such changes in library management as the open shelf arrangement, encouraged the discussion of the ideal plan and organization for various types of libraries.

Traditionally, a library had consisted of a reading room lit by a central clerestory above and side aisles where books were stored in alcoves or on shelves. Nineteenth-century innovations included the use of tiers of books in alcoves, which evolved into the modem "stacks" and the storage of books in floor cases in parallel rows rather than around the perimeter of the room in an attempt to maxiniize light falling on the books rather than the aisles. Librarians urged the adoption of rational plans with a minimum of architectural embellishment and were increasingly critical of the grand, lofty reading room. By 1890, many of the modem ideas had been incorporated into the quintessential freestanding library, a picturesquely massed form developed by Henry Hobson Richardson which often included a stair tower, an arched entry, and the fortress-like book storage wing with windows in the upper wall.

The problem of the form of a library was different in New York where urban density mandated the use of midblock sites. The midblock branch libraries built in New York prior to 1898, had been nearly residential in form and looked to the romantic styles popular in the third quarter of the nineteenth century. The Ottendorfer Branch Library (135 Second Avenue, 1883-84, a designated New York City landmark) by William Schickel was designed to relate to the German Dispensary next door with its mixture of Queen Anne elements and Renaissance detailing and arched entry. The George Bruce Branch library (226 West 42nd Street, 1887-88) designed by George E. Hamey was somewhat Romanesque in style and an arched entrance supported by rusticated piers filled the first story facade. The Jackson Square Branch library (251 W. 13th" Street, 1888, within the Greenwich Village Historic District) designed by Richard Morris Hunt for George W. Vanderbilt, was residential in scale and Flemish in style.

The Harlem Library (32 West 123rd Street, 1891-92) designed by Edgar K. Bourne, which housed the library on the ground floor and bachelor apartments above, was similar to the Romanesque style rowhouse next door.

The use of the neo-classical/Italian Renaissance style in library design as an alternative to the more romantic Richardsonian style, had recently found favor with McKim, Mead & White for the Low Library at Columbia University (1893) and the Gould Mem











New York Free Circulating Library, Bloomingdale Branch




New York Free Circulating Library, Bloomingdale Branch





Upper West Side, Manhattan

The New York Free Circulating Library, Bloomingdale Branch, was the only building commissioned and built by the New York Free Circulating Library and as such is an expression of the library's commitment to the branch circulating library system during the period of peak expansion prior to consolidation with the New York Public Library. A distinguished eighteenth-century French Classic style design inspired by Italian Renaissance and other related sources, it is one of four pre-Camegie era library buildings in New York City and serves as a reminder of the legacy of private philanthropic support of the city's libraries during the nineteenth century. The design of the building, constructed in 1898, by James Brown Lord, architect of the New York Appellate Division Courthouse, appears to have been an influential prototype in the development of the urban branch library, as demonstrated by the design program for the Carnegie gift branch buildings constructed in the early years of the twentieth century. The building, which remains virtually unchanged from the original design, served as the Bloomingdale Branch of the New York Public Library until 1960 and continues in use as a library and research facility for the Ukrainian Academy of Arts and Sciences.

The Bloomingdale Branch building, three stories over a basement, is of steel-frame fireproof construction with brick upper walls. The library was planned with the circulating library located on the main floor; bookshelves lined the walls and served as a room divider, separating the adult and children's areas. A reading room and reference library with a capacity of thirty-six seats occupied the second floor, and the third floor was devoted to janitor's quarters and a storage room. The lighting of the facility was carefully planned and incorporated large windows in the front and smaller windows above the wall shelves at the rear, a large, inclined skylight with Luxfor prismatic glass, and fixtures fitted for both gas and electricity.

The Bloomingdale Branch was erected at a time when there was great interest among both librarians and architects in the design of modem libraries. The well-publicized competition for the main building of the New York Public Library in 1897, the recent construction of the Library of Congress and the Boston Public Library, and the planning of public libraries in many cities, as well as such changes in library management as the open shelf arrangement, encouraged the discussion of the ideal plan and organization for various types of libraries.

Traditionally, a library had consisted of a reading room lit by a central clerestory above and side aisles where books were stored in alcoves or on shelves. Nineteenth-century innovations included the use of tiers of books in alcoves, which evolved into the modem "stacks" and the storage of books in floor cases in parallel rows rather than around the perimeter of the room in an attempt to maxiniize light falling on the books rather than the aisles. Librarians urged the adoption of rational plans with a minimum of architectural embellishment and were increasingly critical of the grand, lofty reading room. By 1890, many of the modem ideas had been incorporated into the quintessential freestanding library, a picturesquely massed form developed by Henry Hobson Richardson which often included a stair tower, an arched entry, and the fortress-like book storage wing with windows in the upper wall.

The problem of the form of a library was different in New York where urban density mandated the use of midblock sites. The midblock branch libraries built in New York prior to 1898, had been nearly residential in form and looked to the romantic styles popular in the third quarter of the nineteenth century. The Ottendorfer Branch Library (135 Second Avenue, 1883-84, a designated New York City landmark) by William Schickel was designed to relate to the German Dispensary next door with its mixture of Queen Anne elements and Renaissance detailing and arched entry. The George Bruce Branch library (226 West 42nd Street, 1887-88) designed by George E. Hamey was somewhat Romanesque in style and an arched entrance supported by rusticated piers filled the first story facade. The Jackson Square Branch library (251 W. 13th" Street, 1888, within the Greenwich Village Historic District) designed by Richard Morris Hunt for George W. Vanderbilt, was residential in scale and Flemish in style. The Harlem Library (32 West 123rd Street, 1891-92) designed by Edgar K. Bourne, which housed the library on the ground floor and bachelor apartments above, was similar to the Romanesque style rowhouse next door.

The use of the neo-classical/Italian Renaissance style in library design as an alternative to the more romantic Richardsonian style, had recently found favor with McKim, Mead & White for the Low Library at Columbia University (1893) and the Gould Memorial Library at the Bronx Campus of New









free floor plan program







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24
2011
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